Archive一月 2019

Guest Post: Why Snail Mail is Still Effective in the Age of the Internet

Guest Post: Why Snail Mail is Still Effective in the Age of the Internet Marketing

Now that brands can reach consumers through emails, texts, and social media, the idea of sending a physical postcard or promotional letter is obsolete, right?

Actually, the above statement couldn’t be more wrong. It’s precisely because of the prevalence of emails and social posts that physical mail has become a more effective marketing tool than ever before. With the average worker receiving 121 emails a day and nearly half of their inbox considered spam, it’s no wonder that many use instant deletion to clear out messages without ever opening a single communication.

Phishing scams pretending to be from secure sites like Apple or Paypal have also led consumers to assume emails are yet another attempt to steal their information. A pause inside the distracting world of electronic messages, mail is a more personal—and trustworthy—way to communicate.

Even though adults under 40 under the age of 30 grew up in an era of smartphones and texting, 36% were still found to enjoy their checking their mailbox each day, according to a Gallup Poll. The number for older demographics is even higher—up to 56% for ages 65 and over.

The U.S. Postal Service conducted a survey that discovered, although participants process digital ads quicker, they spend more time with physical ads, and remember their content better. Survey participants who interacted with physical ads were more emotionally engaged and interested, allowing them to retain the information for much longer. Items promoted in these ads were seen as more desirable and valuable to the consumer.

The tactile quality of touching a piece of direct mail can lead to a deeper level of engagement, making a stronger impact than sight or sound alone. A recent Eagleman Lab study discovered that paper quality heightened this impact. Simple elements such as a handwritten font, physical stamp or unique packaging can make your message feel important. To elevate your offerings above the competition, consider including a sample or small gift that promotes your business.

But don’t think of snail mail as the only way to reach your customer base—consider it as a crucial element in a series of channels that relay your message. Direct mail can push traffic to your website, highlight a special promotion or coupon, even serve as a well-designed, personal way to engage your customers and keep your brand top of mind.

image by TimothyJ via Flickr

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Morning Coffee – 4 January 2019

Morning Coffee - 4 January 2019 Morning Coffee

Here are a few stories to read this Friday morning.

 

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Kindle Android App Now Supports Vertical Scrolling

Kindle Android App Now Supports Vertical Scrolling e-Reading Software Kindle (platform)

Teleread brings our attention to the news that Amazon’s Kindle app for Android now supports continuous scrolling.

Users of the Kindle Android app can now join Kindle Fire tablet users and iOS users in scrolling their way through their latest books – well, most of them, anyway. This feature doesn’t work with PDF or fixed layout ebooks, just regular Kindle ebooks.

Even so, this is still a useful addition. I am reading a lot of non-fiction right now, and a single topic in a chapter might span 3 or 4 screens. With the scrolling feature I can quickly scan an entire topic without having to wait for the page turns.

I wish I had known my Kindle tablet supported this feature; it would have been so useful.

P.S. It’s not clear when this feature was added (the changelog for the last update mentioned only that you could store ebooks on your phone’s external storage) but in the past day or so users on MobileRead and elsewhere have reported that their devices had been updated, after which they were prompted to test the new feature.

Coincidentally, the Kindle app’s listing in Google Play does indicate that the app was updated on 2 January, but it still mentions the old changelog. Also, my app wasn’t updated, but I too have the feature, so we really don’t know when it was added.

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How to Cancel a Kindle Blog or Magazine Subscription

How to Cancel a Kindle Blog or Magazine Subscription Kindle (platform) Tips and Tricks

For as long as Amazon has sold ebooks on the Kindle, they have also sold subscriptions to blogs and other periodicals.The blogs usually cost $0.00 to $1.99 per month, and were automatically every day.

Or at least that is how things  are supposed to work. I just discovered that starting in October, Amazon has been billing me for two subscriptions to my own blog while at the same time neglecting to deliver the content as promised. While this is my own fault (I did place the orders when testing the system), I will also add that I was surprised to learn Amazon has no way to check for duplicate subscriptions or if the content is actually being delivered. (Another unpleasant surprise was the realization that Amazon wasn’t sending me email receipts, either.)

I would like to save my readers from making my mistake, so here’s how you can check your Amazon Kindle account for subscriptions and then cancel the ones you don’t want (but only on Amazon.com; the other Kindle Stores might work differently).

Manage My Content & Devices

As you may know, if you buy Amazon hardware or have bought digital content from Amazon, Amazon has a menu on its site where you can manage your purchases. This menu started out as a single page when Amazon launched the Kindle in 2007, but it has since grown to be a complex and confusing collection of menu pages, tabs, filters, and dropdown menus.

You blog, newspaper, and magazine subscriptions can be found on three different screens which can be accessed via a dropdown menu on the Manage My Content page:

How to Cancel a Kindle Blog or Magazine Subscription Kindle (platform) Tips and Tricks

What you need to do is visit each of the three pages and check to see if you have any active subscriptions that you either don’t recognize or no longer want.

You can cancel a subscription by clicking on the 3-dot menu next to the subscription, and selecting the “Cancel subscription” option.

How to Cancel a Kindle Blog or Magazine Subscription Kindle (platform) Tips and Tricks

 

When I checked, I found that I had two blog subscriptions I didn’t want, so I went ahead and canceled them.

How about you? Did you find any unexpected subscriptions?

 

 

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The Very Slow Movie Player Runs at 24 Frames Per Hour (video)

Both hackers and ereader companies have devoted many hours to tweaking E-ink screens in order to get the highest refresh rate possible. This next project takes things in the opposite direction.

The VSMP, or very slow movie player, combines a Raspberry Pi with an E-ink display to device that plays a movie at about 24 fph (frames per hour). This is about 1/3,600 the speed that movies usually play at, and as a result a traditional epic-length movie is now going to take more than 8,000 hours to play on the VSMP.

The VSMP is programmed it to load a new frame on the screen every two and a half minutes, in effect changing the movie from an experience or an event into something that can “be noticed, glanced-at, or even inspected, but not watched”, and is the work of Bryan Boyer.

“Can a film be consumed at the speed of reading a book?” he asks.  “Yes, just as a car city can be enjoyed on foot. Slowing things down to an extreme measure creates room for appreciation of the object, as in Brasília, but the prolonged duration also starts to shift the relationship between object, viewer, and context.”

In a way, he has created a real-life example of the time dilation effect found in science fiction.

Medium via Hackaday

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